Monthly Archives: April 2013

Designing Mobiles for Education in India’s Low-Cost Schools on GSMA Blog

In a guest post for GSMA’s mLearning blog, we discussed designing mobiles for education in India’s low-cost schools. You can read the full post here.

At the end of 2012, India overtook the United States and the United Kingdom to become the second largest mobile phone market in the world after China. How are mobile phones used in India and what does this mean for opportunities for mobile education?…

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Featured in Education News

EducationNews.org shared background on our report here.

Despite the fact that these schools typically operate on a shoe-string, a full 69% of them – according to the report – have computer labs on site and nearly 60% use some kind of technology in the classroom to improve lesson delivery. The bad news is that while the schools obviously set aside funding to equip themselves and are excited about the potential that digital technology can bring to their classrooms, they remain in the dark about the best way to use these tools to improve academic outcomes.

Report Featured on EdSurge

Our report was featured on EdSurge.

We particularly like the report’s comments on why this “hype-to-failure” cycle persists: “A poor understanding of an educational community lends itself to weak technology integration and ed-tech ineffectiveness in schools.” Ditto!

 

Ed-Tech India Report Featured on YourStory.in

YourStory.in, India’s leading comprehensive online platform for entrepreneurs, featured our report on their site. They highlighted some of the gaps and opportunities for ed-tech interventions in affordable private schools. Read the article here.

Press Release for Report

New Report — Education Technology in India:

Designing Ed-Tech for Affordable Private Schools

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Hyderabad, India – Education technology interventions have the power to completely reinvent education for children in the developing world. But time and again these interventions have failed to reach their potential due to a lack of understanding of the school environment and users.

As a team of researchers in Hyderabad, India, we sought to understand how education technology (ed-tech) solutions could be better designed to serve the needs of users in low-income private schools. We are proud to share our findings, released in this report – Education Technology in India: Designing Ed-tech for Affordable Private Schools.

Education Technology in India: Designing Ed-Tech for Affordable Private Schools reveals in-depth insights into the relationships that affordable private school (APS) stakeholders–school leaders, students, parents and teachers–have with technology. It outlines the factors that primarily influence consumption by school leaders and parents, and shares the main reasons for poor technology adoption among teachers. It also reveals significant differences in technology access between genders, as girls report 40% less Internet access and 26% less computer access than their male counterparts.

The report  goes beyond consumer insights to explore the benefits and drawbacks of a fast growing ed-tech trend in the developing world: the tablet. We outline use cases, business models, and stakeholder perceptions of tablets in the classroom. Based on interviews with two APS in Hyderabad that have implemented tablets, we found that APS stakeholders were largely excited by the opportunity to acquire tablets, though some expressed concern about the price, functionality, and content.

The report concludes with a look into what the future of ed-tech in India’s APS sector could be by highlighting market opportunities for technology solutions that APS stakeholders would value and benefit from. In the 12 opportunities outlined in the report, we call for innovations in content development, hardware development, service elements of ed-tech providers, and socio-cultural integration in individuals’ lives.

Our hope is that the information provided in Education Technology in India: Designing Ed-Tech for Affordable Private Schools will act as a foundation for better-designed technology. It will hopefully help deliver good ed-tech in places that could reap the most benefit from well-designed technology interventions.

REPORT RELEASE! Education Technology in India: Designing Ed-Tech for Affordable Private Schools

Education technology interventions have promised the reinvention of education for children in the developing world. But time and again these interventions have failed to reach their potential due to a lack of understanding of the school environment and users, leading to poor implementation of the product.

As a team of researchers in Hyderabad, India, we sought to understand how education technology solutions could be better designed to serve the needs of users. Insights were garnered from surveys, interviews, various human-centered design research methods, and secondary research conducted in 2012 and 2013 in Hyderabad, India.

We are proud to share our findings, released in the report, which you can download at this link:

Education Technology in India – Designing Ed-Tech for Affordable Private Schools

Our hope is that the information provided in Education Technology in India will act as a foundation for better-designed technology in places that could reap the most benefit from well-designed product interventions.

Please read and share our report widely among your friends and colleagues and via social media.

Contact us here.

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10 ICT Trends in Schools

In the next few days, we’ll be releasing our report on ed-tech in APS in India. The report discusses barriers to implementation and gaps and opportunities for education technology in India’s low-income schools.

Yesterday, The Hindu published an article by Sitaram Venkat about ten education technology trends that India’s schools should be aware of. The article identified trends such as better content creation, personal learning, and the role of teachers, which we also discuss in our report.

He explains:

“The creation of an interactive experience for students is imperative. Similarly the new-generation teacher must be technologically enabled to meet the demands of the student. Establishing technology as an enabler instead of a disruptive force will create a teacher-led pull for technology adoption. Additionally, uniform access to world-class content is essential. The opportunity is available now to build such an ecosystem.”

Here are the 10 trends he mentions:

1. Personal Computing

2. Better Content Creation

3. Anytime, Anywhere

4. Learning Made Personal

5. Cloud Computing

6. Game-on

7. Teacher Generated Content

8. Smart Portfolio Assessment

9. Teacher’s Role

10. Learning Spaces

Read the full article and about these trends here. And stay tuned for the release of our report!

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